disasters can be prepared for

Natural disasters can strike any time and any where. Although some areas are more prone to a certain type of event, no place on the map is immune. It is up to you ultimately to look out for your own safety as well as your family’s.

People affected by horrific weather-related events or other natural disasters can be on their own for several days. Many times there is little to no warning when these horrific displays of nature happen, so being prepared is not only responsible, but could very well save your life. It will also give rescuers more time helping those who are in worse shape than you.

pre-packed 3 day emergency kit

 
 
 

Hurricanes. Blizzards. Tornadoes. Floods. Ask anyone who has ever suffered through a natural disaster if they were fortunate enough to keep their home, the one thing that will come up will be how quickly the supplies in the home are quickly depleted. This article will help stave off the immediate need for assistance and help you and your family to survive and maintain a small measure of comfort. It will also, if necessary, give you the ability to travel to safety.

Making a disaster preparedness kits for each member of the family is not only a great way to examine what your needs may be in case of a disastrous event, but also it helps bring awareness on what you’ll be able to carry if necessary. This is very important because you may find yourself miles away from aid. Your kit should last at least 3 days, and should include food, water, and other supplies which we will cover later on. it should be in a water tight container f possible (Rubbermaid, Tupperware etc.) and remember SIZE does matter. Only pack what you can carry.

Clean drinking water is always the first thing on your list. You need at least one gallon of water per person per day. It doesn’t sound like too much, but one gallon of water weighs almost eight pounds! So, when you’re planning a three day pack realize that before you pack that first energy bar you’re carrying 25 lbs already.

Tap water which is treated works better than bottled or spring water, though you can treat those to make them suffice. Well water users should use their regular treatments. Water should be sealed in a tight container, in a cool and dry place. No matter which you decide to use, remember to switch out with fresh water every six months.

her own survival kit - kids love to be involved

When choosing food supplies, it comes down to which foods will give you the most bang for the buck, or weight, in this instance. Canned goods and ready-to-eat meals are a good choice, but can be heavy. A better choice maybe things like; peanut butter, a great source of protein. Crackers, granola bars, cereals and trail mix are also great choices. Why? Good caloric intake, and they preserve well. Other things for your “goodie bag of life” might include salt, pepper, sugar, instant coffee/tea. Don’t forget a manual can opener!!

Pre existing medical conditions must be taken into account when preparing yourself or your family. If possible try to keep fresh medication or treatments in your disaster kit. Check with your doctor or pharmacist in regards to storage of medicine whenever possible. Standard first aid supplies should be in your kit as well; bandages, gauze pads, cotton balls, safety pins, latex gloves.

emergency preparedness - you can do it!

Cleansing antibiotic ointments, germicidal soaps, baby wipes are all incredibly useful when emergency situations arise as you make your way to safety. Aspirin anti diarrheal medication, vitamins, and ipecac syrup are also very good things to have stowed away in your kit as well.

Other emergency supplies you may consider depending on how much you can carry. battery operated radio or tv. (with extra batteries) crank operated, duct tape, scissors, plastic sheeting, copies of important documents, cash,and or travelers checks, blankets, bedding or sleeping bags, change of clothes, something to do (book, game, etc.)

So is this a lot? Absolutely it is, but it is also is EVERYTHING you need to ensure survival. This is definitely not something you want to under pack pr over pack for, so see what works for you! See what weight you can carry, what’s too bulky, because it’s not something you want to find out after the fact.

If you’re looking for other sources of emergency survival information, you can try FEMA’s website, The American Red Cross, or right here at Project195, as we will always give plenty of information regarding this and other topics.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>